Sourdough Starter – Day 9

February 01st, 2012  | Category: Bread

Sourdough Starter

The sourdough starter is ready at last!

Remember how it rose yesterday? Looks like it rose almost twice as much after the last feeding.

The napkin on top kept it from overflowing… Almost.

A teaspoon of it has found its way, but the rest is fine.

Sourdough Starter Rising - Day 9

Sourdough Starter - Day 9

Sourdough Starter Rise - Day 9

Sourdough Starter Crust - Day 9

By the way, just a quick tip on what to do when the crust sticks to the napkin: Place it in the freezer for 10 minutes. It peels away without any mess.

Sourdough Starter The Crust - Day 9

Now it’s time to bake some bread.

Sourdough Starter Feed - Day 9

Tartine’s “Basic Country Bread” is at the top of my list. Any other suggestions? Is there a sourdough recipe you just can not live without?

Let me know!

HOW TO MAKE A SOURDOUGH STARTER

SOURDOUGH STARTER RECIPE – DAY 9

Recipe adapted from “Tartine Bread” by Chad Robertson

Ingredients

  • 125 grams (3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons) bread and whole wheat flour (%50-%50) blend
  • 100 grams (approximately 1/3 cup + 1 tablespoon) lukewarm water

Method

  1. Remove crust and discard 80% of the sourdough starter.
  2. Add flour and water and mix until no lumps remain.
  3. Wipe the rim clean, cover with a clean cloth and place in a cool spot in your kitchen.
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Comments

  1. 1 - susan, australia on February 1st, 2012

    We made some apricot jam yesterday in preparation for our on-line slice!

  2. 2 - James G on February 2nd, 2012

    I have had consistently good results with the Tartine basic sourdough; I feed my starter the night before I plan to bake a loaf and it always works perfectly.

  3. 3 - Peter Gordon on February 2nd, 2012

    When I worked in a bakery we had a 30 gallon tub of starter that we would use to make the daily bread. We would then use the remaining starter clinging to the sides of the tub, scrape it down to the bottom and feed it, small amounts at first and then more as it grew. This starter was very strong and would be ready the next morning to make the next day’s bread. There is a bread Desem, which is (baker’s percentage) 39.46% bread flour, 2.24% salt, and 121.08% whole wheat starter (50-50 whole wheat and bread flour). After mixing and kneading the first rising is 4 hours. Deflate form loaf then let rise 2 hours in high humidity. Bake with steam at 450 till brown then reduce heat to 350 for a total of 1 hour.
    This bread is as close to a natural bread as you can get.
    I am new to your blog but am enjoying it very much. I spent several years in Istanbul and I am looking forward to seeing more Turkish food.

  4. 4 - Sharyn Dimmick on February 2nd, 2012

    If you can get The Cheese Board Collective Works, the book by The Cheese Board in Berkeley, CA, try their wolverines (sourdough buns with dried fruit and nuts) or their cheese rolls. Both are delicious.

  5. 5 - lien on February 2nd, 2012

    i feel hungry already! :-)

  6. 6 - bill on February 3rd, 2012

    That looks great. I have been following its status daily. I kept a sourdough, that I made from scratch, for 3 years. I lost it during a move. My brother has had one going for over 30 years. He makes the best bread and pancakes I have ever had.

    I recommend using a plastic spoon to scoop a bit on to some plastic wrap and putting it in the freezer. I will last forever. I like to take old ones out and have a few starters going at once. They are never the same and always interesting.

  7. 7 - Maureen on February 3rd, 2012

    Following your steps and so far I’m still at the stinky stage. Looking at these photos give me hope. Can’t wait for the bread and Susan’s apricot jam.

  8. 8 - Giovani on February 4th, 2012

    It’s doing great, can’t wait to see how your bread turns out. We make a version of Tartine’s country bread where I work using this starter method, I know you won’t be disappointed.

    If anyone’s looking to use up some of the discarded starter they can make sourdough pan cakes or waffles. King Arthur Flour has a great recipe online.

  9. 9 - SmultronSoul on February 7th, 2012

    I really like Norwich Sourdough from the Wild Yeast Blog. Last night I baked her Multigrain Sourdough and that turned out beautiful as well!

    http://www.wildyeastblog.com/

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